"System change is now inevitable. Either because we do something about it, or because we will be hit by climate change. '...

"We need to develop economic models that are fit for purpose. The current economic frameworks, the ones that dominate our governments, these frameworks... the current economic frameworks, the neoclassical, the market frameworks, can deal with small changes. It can tell you the difference, if a sock company puts up the price of socks, what the demand for socks will be. It cannot tell you about the sorts of system level changes we are talking about here. We would not use an understanding of laminar flow in fluid dynamics to understand turbulent flow. So why is it we are using marginal economics, small incremental change economics, to understand system level changes?"

Thursday, July 2, 2009

Age discrimination

I find it interesting that age discrimination is frowned upon in most situations but celebrated in science. It's a bit demoralizing now that I am on the losing side of the proposition, but I can see both sides of the argument. 


3 comments:

thingsbreak said...

The discrimination is even less defensible now that it can't even be used to screen out the "gone emeritus" hacks, as certain folk seem to be "going emeritus" quite early these days. ;)

James Annan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
James Annan said...

Word.

It seems that unless you have "made it" by a certain age, you are deemed to be a "never-was-and-never-will-be". While this may be true for some sterotypical view of a "successful scientific career" as inevitably culminating in a professorship at a prestigious university with a large research group, excellent scientific research can be done by anyone, at any age, with pretty much any background. Were it not for the job insecurity, I would find very little to complain about in my position, for example (even with the job insecurity, it's not too bad).