"System change is now inevitable. Either because we do something about it, or because we will be hit by climate change. '...

"We need to develop economic models that are fit for purpose. The current economic frameworks, the ones that dominate our governments, these frameworks... the current economic frameworks, the neoclassical, the market frameworks, can deal with small changes. It can tell you the difference, if a sock company puts up the price of socks, what the demand for socks will be. It cannot tell you about the sorts of system level changes we are talking about here. We would not use an understanding of laminar flow in fluid dynamics to understand turbulent flow. So why is it we are using marginal economics, small incremental change economics, to understand system level changes?"

Monday, July 28, 2008

Wishful thinking department

A not-very-informative history of climate change science  is remarkable only for its headline:
Ian Sample looks at how the study of the climate has moved from being a relatively minor branch of science to one that now dominates most others, thanks largely to the work of one man
Leaving aside the toxic lone-genius model of science, i.e., science as mutant superpower (see "Good Will Hunting"), wouldn't it be nice?

If you're seriously interested in the topic, Spencer Weart is a good source. 



No comments: