"System change is now inevitable. Either because we do something about it, or because we will be hit by climate change. '...

"We need to develop economic models that are fit for purpose. The current economic frameworks, the ones that dominate our governments, these frameworks... the current economic frameworks, the neoclassical, the market frameworks, can deal with small changes. It can tell you the difference, if a sock company puts up the price of socks, what the demand for socks will be. It cannot tell you about the sorts of system level changes we are talking about here. We would not use an understanding of laminar flow in fluid dynamics to understand turbulent flow. So why is it we are using marginal economics, small incremental change economics, to understand system level changes?"

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Huitres aux Petrole

Oysters love crude oil! It's true!



Actually, the thing I found most interesting (among several interesting things) about this oddity is the distinction between "business" and "industry" in the concluding statement.

I think that "business" has been bamboozled into thinking they are the same thing as "industry" and that it's "big government" that is the enemy. The enemy of small, local, human-scale socially beneficial businesses, of course, is "government" largely to the extent that it is under the thumb of "industry". Now that coffee and cheeseburgers, haircuts and oil changes are "industrial" processes it's easier to lose track of that.

via reallyseriously.org h/t @sejorg

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